Context

A reference to your Prisma Client instance will be added to the context under the db property.

Example

1import { schema } from 'nexus'
2
3schema.objectType({
4 name: 'Query',
5 definition(t) {
6 t.list.field('users', {
7 type: 'User',
8 resolve(parent, args, ctx) {
9 return ctx.db.user.findMany() // <== `ctx.db` is your Prisma Client instance
10 },
11 })
12 },
13})

t.model

Only available within schema.objectType definitions.

t.model contains configurable field projectors that you use for projecting fields of your Prisma models onto your GraphQL Objects. The precise behaviour of field projectors vary by the Prisma type being projected. Refer to the respective sub-sections for details.

Model-object mapping

t.model will either have field projectors for the Prisma model whose name matches that of the GraphQL Object, or if the GraphQL Object is of a name that does not match any of your Prisma models then t.model becomes a function allowing you to specify the mapping, after which the field projectors become available.

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
1model User {
2 id String @id @default(cuid())
3}

Enum

Auto-Projection

When a Prisma enum field is projected, the corresponding enum type will be automatically projected too (added to the GraphQL schema).

Member Customization

You can customize the projected enum members by defining the enum yourself in Nexus. nexus-plugin-prisma will treat the name collision as an intent to override and so disable auto-projection.

Option Notes

Currently Prisma enums cannot be aliased (issue). They also cannot be type mapped since enum types cannot be mapped yet (issue).

Options

n/a

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1type M {
2 MEF: E # ! <-- if not ? or @default
3}
4
5# if not defined by user
6enum E {
7 EV
8}

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
1model User {
2 role Role
3 mood Mood
4}
5
6enum Mood {
7 HAPPY
8 SAD
9 CONFUSED
10}
11
12enum Role {
13 MEMBER
14 EDITOR
15 ADMIN
16}

Scalar

Scalar Mapping

Prisma scalars are mapped to GraphQL scalars as follows:

1 Prisma GraphQL
2 ------ -------
3 Boolean <> Boolean
4 String <> String
5 Int <> Int
6 Float <> Float
7 cuid() <> ID
8 DateTime <> DateTime (custom scalar)
9 uuid() <> UUID (custom scalar)

Auto-Projection

When a Prisma scalar is encountered that does not map to the standard GraphQL scalar types, it will be automatically projected (custom scalar added to the GraphQL schema). Examples include DateTime and UUID.

Option Notes

It is not possible to use type because there is currently no way for a Prisma scalar to map to a differently named GraphQL scalar.

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1type M {
2 MSF: S # ! <-- if not ? or @default
3}
4
5# if not matching a standard GQL scalar
6scalar S

Options

alias resolve

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
1model User {
2 id String @id @default(cuid())
3 email String
4 scheduledPublish DateTime?
5 rating Float
6 active Boolean
7}

Relation

Projecting relational fields only affects the current GraphQL object being defined. That is, the model that the field relates to is not auto-projected. This is a design choice intended to keep the nexus-plugin-prisma system predictable for you. If you forget to project a relation you will receive feedback at build/boot time letting you know.

Options

type alias resolve

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1type M {
2 MRF: RM # ! <-- if not ?
3}

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
1model User {
2 latestPost Post?
3}
4
5model Post {
6 title String
7 body String
8}

List Enum

Like enums. It is not possible to order (issue) paginate (issue) or filter (issue) enum lists.

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1type M {
2 MLEF: [E!]!
3}
4
5# if not defined by user
6enum E {
7 EV
8}

List Scalar

Like scalars. It is not possible to order (issue) paginate (issue) or filter (issue) scalar lists.

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1type M {
2 MLSF: [S!]!
3}

List Relation

Like relations but also supports batch related options.

Options

type alias resolve filtering pagination ordering

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1type M {
2 MLRF: [RM!]!
3}

t.crud

t.crud is an experimental feature. You must explicitly enable it via the plugin options.

Only available within GraphQL Query and Mutation definitions.

t.crud contains configurable operation publishers that you use for exposing create, read, update, and delete mutations against your projected Prisma models.

There are 8 kinds of operations (reflecting a subset of Prisma Client's capabilities). An operation publisher is the combination of some operation kind and a particular Prisma model. Thus the number of operation publishers on t.crud is Prisma model count × operation kind count. So for example if you defined 20 Prisma models then you would see 160 operation publishers on t.crud.

Example

1model User {
2 ...
3}
1schema.queryType({
2 definition(t) {
3 t.crud.user()
4 t.crud.users()
5 },
6})
7
8schema.mutationType({
9 definition(t) {
10 t.crud.createOneUser()
11 t.crud.updateOneUser()
12 t.crud.upsertOneUser()
13 t.crud.deleteOneUser()
14
15 t.crud.updateManyUser()
16 t.crud.deleteManyUser()
17 },
18})

Create

1t.crud.createOne<M>

Allow clients to create one record at at time of the respective Prisma model.

Relation fields may be connected with an existing record or a sub-create may be inlined (generally referred to as nested mutations). If the relation is a List then multiple connections or sub-creates are permitted.

Inlined creates are very similar to top-level ones but have the important difference that the sub-create has excluded the field where supplying its relation to the type of parent Object being created would normally be. This is because a sub-create forces its record to relate to the parent one.

Underlying Prisma Client Function

create

Options

type alias resolve

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1mutation {
2 createOne_M(data: M_CreateInput): M!
3}
4
5input M_CreateInput {
6 MSF: S # ! <-- if not ? or @default
7 MRF: RM_CreateManyWithout_M # ! <-- if not ? or @default
8}
9
10input RM_CreateManyWithout_M {
11 connect: [RM_WhereUniqueInput!]
12 create: [RM_CreateWithout_M_Input!]
13}
14
15input RM_WhereUniqueInput {
16 MRF@unique: S
17}
18
19input RM_CreateWithout_M_Input = RM_CreateInput - RMRF: M

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
Client
1model User {
2 id Int @id @unique
3 email String @unique
4 posts Post[]
5}
6
7model Post {
8 id Int @id
9 title String @unique
10 body String
11 author User
12}

Read

1t.crud.<M>

Allow clients to find one particular record of the respective Prisma model. They may search by any Prisma model field that has been marked with @unique attribute.

The ability for list fields to be filtered, ordered, or paginated depends upon if those features have been enabled for those GraphQL objects via t.model.<ListRelation>.

Underlying Prisma Client function

findOne

Options

type alias resolve

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1mutation {
2 M(where: M_WhereUniqueInput): M!
3}
4
5input M_WhereUniqueInput {
6 MF: S # if @unique
7}

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
Client
1model User {
2 id Int @id @unique
3 email String @unique
4}

Update

1t.crud.updateOne<M>

Allow clients to update one particular record at a time of the respective Prisma model.

Underlying Prisma Client function

update

Options

type alias resolve

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1mutation {
2 updateOne_M(data: M_UpdateInput!, where: M_WhereUniqueInput!): M
3}
4
5input M_WhereUniqueInput {
6 MF: S # if @unique
7}
8
9input M_UpdateInput {
10 MSF: S
11 MRF: RM_UpdateManyWithout_M_Input
12}
13
14input RM_UpdateManyWithout_M_Input {
15 connect: [RM_WhereUniqueInput!]
16 create: [RM_CreateWithout_M_Input!]
17 delete: [RM_WhereUniqueInput!]
18 deleteMany: [RM_ScalarWhereInput!] # see batch filtering reference
19 disconnect: [RM_WhereUniqueInput!]
20 set: [RM_WhereUniqueInput!]
21 update: [RM_UpdateWithWhereUniqueWithout_M_Input!]
22 updateMany: [RM_UpdateManyWithWhereNestedInput!]
23 upsert: [RM_UpsertWithWhereUniqueWithout_M_Input!]
24}
25
26input RM_WhereUniqueInput {} # recurse pattern like M_WhereUniqueInput
27
28input RM_CreateWithout_M_Input {} # RM_CreateInput - RMRF: M
29
30input RM_UpdateWithWhereUniqueWithout_M_Input {
31 data: RM_UpdateWithout_M_DataInput!
32 where: RM_WhereUniqueInput!
33}
34input RM_UpdateWithout_M_DataInput {
35 RMSF: S
36}
37
38input RM_UpdateManyWithWhereNestedInput {
39 data: RM_UpdateManyDataInput!
40 where: RM_ScalarWhereInput! # see batch filtering reference
41}
42
43input RM_UpsertWithWhereUniqueWithout_M_Input {
44 create: RM_CreateWithout_M_Input!
45 update: RM_UpdateWithout_M_DataInput!
46 where: RM_WhereUniqueInput!
47}

For S_ScalarWhereInput see batch filtering contributions.

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
Client
1model User {
2 id Int @id @unique
3 email String @unique
4 posts Post[]
5}
6
7model Post {
8 id Int @id
9 title String @unique
10 body String
11 author User
12}

Upsert

1t.crud.upsertOne<M>

Allow clients to update or create (aka. insert) one particular record at a time of the respective Prisma model. This operation is a combination of create and update. The generated GraphQL mutation matches data and where args to those of update, and create to that of data arg in create. Unlike update, upsert guarantees a return value.

Underlying Prisma Client function

upsert

Options

type alias resolve

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1mutation {
2 upsertOne_M(
3 create: M_CreateInput! # like createOne(data ...)
4 data: M_UpdateInput! # like updateOne(data ...)
5 where: M_WhereUniqueInput! # like updateOne(where ...)
6 ): M!
7}

For M_UpdateInput and M_WhereUniqueInput see update contributions.
For M_CreateInput see create contributions.

Example

Refer to update and create.

Delete

1t.crud.deleteOne<M>

Allow clients to delete one particular record at a time of the respective Prisma model.

Underlying Prisma Client function

delete

Options

type alias resolve

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1mutation {
2 deleteOne_M(where: M_WhereUniqueInput): M
3}
4
5input M_WhereUniqueInput {
6 MF@unique: S
7}

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
Client
1model User {
2 id Int @id @unique
3 email String @unique
4 posts Post[]
5}
6
7model Post {
8 id Int @id
9 title String @unique
10 body String
11 author User
12}

Batch Read

1t.crud.<M Pluralized>

Allow clients to fetch multiple records at once of the respective Prisma model.

Underlying Prisma Client Function

findMany

Options

type alias resolve filtering pagination ordering computedInputs(local and global)

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1type Query {
2 M_s: [M!]!
3}

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
1model User {
2 id Int @id @unique
3 email String @unique
4 posts Post[]
5}
6
7model Post {
8 id Int @id
9 title String @unique
10 body String
11 author User
12}

Batch Update

1t.crud.updateMany<M>

Allow clients to update multiple records of the respective Prisma model at once. Unlike update nested relation-updating is not supported here. Clients get back a BatchPayload object letting them know the number of affected records, but not access to the fields of affected records.

Underlying Prisma Client Function

updateMany

Options

type alias resolve

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1mutation {
2 updateMany_M(where: M_WhereInput, data: M_UpdateManyMutationInput): BatchPayload!
3}
4
5input M_UpdateManyMutationInput {
6 MSF: S
7 MEF: E
8 # not possible to batch update relations
9}
10
11type BatchPayload {
12 count: Int!
13}

For M_WhereInput see batch filtering contributions.

Example

1mutation updateManyUser(where: {...}, data: { status: ACTIVE }) {
2 count
3}

See filtering option example. Differences are: operation semantics (update things); return type; data arg.

Batch Delete

1t.crud.deleteMany<M>

Allow clients to delete multiple records of the respective Prisma model at once. Clients get back a BatchPayload object letting them know the number of affected records, but not access to the fields of affected records.

Underlying Prisma Client Function

deleteMany

Options

type alias resolve

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1mutation {
2 deleteMany_M(where: M_WhereInput): BatchPayload!
3}
4
5type BatchPayload {
6 count: Int!
7}

For M_WhereInput see filtering contribution.

Example

1mutation {
2 deleteManyUser(where: {...}) {
3 count
4 }
5}

See filtering option example. Differences are: operation semantics (delete things); return type.

Options

alias

1undefined | String

Applies To

t.crud.<*> t.model.<* - enum, list enum>

About

  • undefined (default) By default Prisma model fields project onto GraphQL object fields of the same name.
  • string Change which GraphQL object field the Prisma model field projects onto.

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

n/a

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
1model Post {
2 body String
3}

type

1undefined | String

Applies To

t.crud.<*> t.model.<Relation> t.model.<ListRelation>

About

  • undefined (default) Point Prisma field to a GraphQL object whose name matches that of the Prisma field model type.

  • string Point Prisma field to the given GraphQL object. This option can become necessary when you've have done model-object mapping and other Prisma models in your schema have relations to the name-mapped Prisma model. We are interested in developing further the model-object mapping API to automate this better (issue).

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

n/a

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
1model User {
2 id String @id @default(cuid())
3 posts Post[]
4}
5
6model Post {
7 id String @id @default(cuid())
8}

resolve

1undefined | (root: Root, args: Args, ctx: Context, info: GraphQLResolverInfo, originalResolve: <T>(root: Root, args: Args, ctx: Context, info: GraphQLResolverInfo): T) => T

Applies To

t.crud.<*> t.model.<*>

About

Enable the usage of a custom resolver on any resolver generated by the plugin via t.crud or t.model. You can either entirely replace the generated resolver, or wrap it via the use of the originalResolve parameter.

Example

Adding custom business logic before and after a generated resolver

1queryType({
2 definition(t) {
3 t.crud.posts({
4 async resolve(root, args, ctx, info, originalResolve) {
5 console.log('logic before the resolver')
6 const res = await originalResolve(root, args, ctx, info)
7 console.log('logic after the resolver')
8 return res
9 },
10 })
11 },
12})

ordering

1undefined | true | false | ModelWhitelist

Applies To

t.crud.<BatchRead> t.model.<ListRelation>

About

Allow clients to order the records in a list field. Records can be ordered by their projected scalar fields in ascending or descending order. Ordering by fields on relations is not currently possible (issue).

  • undefined (default) Like false
  • false Disable ordering
  • true Enable ordering by all scalar fields
  • ModelWhitelist (Record<string, true>) Enable ordering by just Model scalar fields appearing in the given whitelist.

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

1# t.crud.<BatchRead>
2M(orderBy: M_OrderByInput)
3
4# t.model.<ListRelation>
5type M {
6 MF(orderBy: M_OrderByInput)
7}
8
9input M_OrderByInput {
10 MSF: OrderByArg
11 # It is not possible to order by relations
12}
13
14enum OrderByArg {
15 asc
16 desc
17}

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
Client
1model User {
2 id Int @id
3 name String
4 posts Post[]
5}
6
7model Post {
8 id Int @id
9 title String
10 body String
11}

pagination

1undefined | true | false

Applies to

t.crud.<BatchRead> t.model.<ListRelation>

About

  • undefined (default) Like true
  • true Enable pagination
  • false Disable pagination

GraphQL Schema Contributions

1# t.crud.<BatchRead>
2Ms(
3 # The starting object for the list (typically ID or other unique value).
4 after: M_WhereUniqueInput
5
6 # The last object for the list (typically ID or other unique value)
7 before: M_WhereUniqueInput
8
9 # How many elements, forwards from `after` otherwise head
10 first: Int
11
12 # How many elements, backwards from `before` otherwise tail
13 last: Int
14
15 # The offset
16 # If `first` used, then forwards from `after` (otherwise head)
17 # If `last` used, then backwards from `before` (otherwise tail)
18)
19
20# t.model.<ListRelation>
21type M {
22 MRF(after: M_WhereUniqueInput, before: M_WhereUniqueInput, first: Int, last: Int)
23}
24
25input M_WhereUniqueInput {
26 MSF@unique: S
27}

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
Client
1model User {
2 id Int @id
3 posts Post[]
4 // ...
5}
6
7model Post {
8 id Int @id
9 // ...
10}

filtering

1undefined | true | false | ModelWhitelist

Applies to

t.crud.<BatchRead> t.model.<ListRelation>

About

  • undefined (default) Like false
  • true Enable filtering for all scalar fields
  • false Disable filtering
  • ModelWhitelist (Record<string, true>) Enable ordering by just Model scalar fields appearing in the given whitelist.

GraphQL Schema Contributions ?

See batch filtering contributions

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
Client
1model User {
2 id String @id @unique @default(cuid())
3 posts Post[]
4 age Int
5 status UserStatus
6}
7
8model Post {
9 id String @id @unique @default(cuid())
10 author User
11 comments Comment[]
12 rating Float
13}
14
15model Comment {
16 id String @id @unique @default(cuid())
17 author User
18 post Post
19 content String
20}
21
22enum UserStatus {
23 BANNED
24 ACTIVE
25}

computedInputs (local)

1Record<string, ({ args, ctx, info }: MutationResolverParams) => unknown>

Note: This is an abbreviated version of the ComputedInputs type. The most important thing to understand is that each of the object's values will be a function that takes an object with "args", "ctx", and "info" keys that represent the runtime values of the corresponding parameters that are passed to your resolver. For the full type, see ComputedInputs Type Details.

Applies to

t.crud.<mutations>

About

Allow clients to omit fields from one mutation's corresponding input type and infer the value of those fields from the resolver's params (args, context, info) at runtime when determining what to pass to Prisma Client.

  • ComputedInputs (Record<string, ({ args, ctx, info }: MutationResolverParams) => unknown>) (full type here).

    Keys in the ComputedInputs object will be omitted from the mutation's corresponding input type. When resolving the mutation at runtime, each omitted key will be passed to Prisma Client based on the return value of that key's corresponding function in the ComputedInputs object when passed that resolver's parameters at runtime.

GraphQL Schema Contributions

The mutation's input type fields with a name that is in the ComputedInputs object are omitted from the GraphQL schema. This modifies one existing input type but does not add new types or remove existing types.

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
Client
1model User {
2 id Int @id
3 name String
4 createdWithBrowser String
5}

computedInputs (global)

1Record<string, ({ args, ctx, info}: MutationResolverParams) => any>

Note: This is an abbreviated version of the ComputedInputs type. The most important thing to understand each of the object's values will be a function that takes an object with "args", "ctx", and "info" keys that represent the runtime values of the corresponding parameters that are passed to your resolver. For the full type, see ComputedInputs Type Details.

Applies to

nexusPrismaPlugin()

About

Allow clients to omit fields with a given name across all of their GraphQL schema's inputs and infer the value of those fields from context when determining what to pass to Prisma Client

  • ComputedInputs (Record<string, ({ args, ctx, info }: MutationResolverParams) => any>) (full type here).

    Keys in the ComputedInputs object will be omitted from all input types. When resolving any mutation at runtime, that mutation's input type will be recursively searched for the omitted keys. Any time one of those keys would have appeared anywhere in the mutation's input type, a value will be passed to Prisma Client based on the return value of that key's corresponding function in the ComputedInputs object when passed the resolver's parameters at runtime.

GraphQL Schema Contributions

All input type fields with a name that is in the ComputedInputs object are omitted from the GraphQL schema. This modifies existing input types but does not add new types or remove existing types.

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
Client
1model User {
2 id Int @id
3 name String
4 nested Nested[]
5 createdWithBrowser String
6}
7
8model Nested {
9 id Int @id
10 name String
11 createdWithBrowser String
12}

If {user: {connect: {where: {id: 1}}}} looks familiar, global computedInputs can also be used to determine the user making a request and automatically populate mutations affecting a single user accordingly. For example, assuming Prisma Client' context includes a "userId" key, adding a user key to global computedInputs can simplify the "createOneNested" mutation from the previous example:

1nexusPrismaPlugin({
2 ...other config...
3 computedInputs: {
4 createdWithBrowser: ({ctx}) => ctx.browser,
5 user: ({ctx}) => ({ connect: { where: { id: ctx.userId } } }),
6 },
7})
1mutation createOneNested {
2 createOneNested({data: {name: "Moony"}}) {
3 id
4 name
5 createdWithBrowser
6 }
7}

ComputedInputs type details

1/**
2 * Represents arguments required by Prisma Client that will
3 * be derived from a request's input (root, args, and context)
4 * and omitted from the GraphQL API. The object itself maps the
5 * names of these args to a function that takes an object representing
6 * the request's input and returns the value to pass to the Prisma Client
7 * arg of the same name.
8 */
9export type LocalComputedInputs<MethodName extends MutationMethodName> = Record<
10 string,
11 (params: LocalMutationResolverParams<MethodName>) => unknown
12>
13
14export type GlobalComputedInputs = Record<string, (params: GlobalMutationResolverParams) => unknown>
15
16type BaseMutationResolverParams = {
17 info: GraphQLResolveInfo
18 ctx: Context
19}
20
21export type GlobalMutationResolverParams = BaseMutationResolverParams & {
22 args: Record<string, any> & {
23 data: unknown
24 }
25}
26
27export type LocalMutationResolverParams<
28 MethodName extends MutationMethodName
29> = BaseMutationResolverParams & {
30 args: core.GetGen<'argTypes'>['Mutation'][MethodName]
31}
32
33export type MutationMethodName = keyof core.GetGen<'argTypes'>['Mutation']
34
35export type Context = core.GetGen<'context'>

General System Behaviours

Null-Free Lists

Projection for Prisma list types always project as a fully non-nullable GraphQL type. This is because Prisma list fields (and list member type) can themselves never be null, and because Prisma does not support @default on list types.

For consistency we also apply the same pattern for t.crud.<BatchRead>.

Example

Prisma
Nexus
GraphQL
1model User {
2 posts Post[]
3}

Batch Filtering

Where Does it Appear?

1query {
2 # When filtering option is enabled
3 Ms(where: M_WhereInput, ...): [M!]!
4}
5
6mutation {
7 updateMany_M(where: M_WhereInput, ...) BatchPayload!
8 deleteMany_M(where: M_WhereInput): BatchPayload!
9}
10
11type M {
12 # When filtering option is enabled
13 MRF: RM(where: RM_WhereInput): [RM!]!
14}
15
16# Nested InputObjects from t.crud.update<M>
17
18# Nested InputObjects from t.crud.upsert<M>

What Structure Does it Have?

1input M_WhereInput {
2 AND: [M_WhereInput!]
3 NOT: [M_WhereInput!]
4 OR: [M_WhereInput!]
5 MSF: S_Filter
6 MRF: RM_Filter
7}
8
9input RM_Filter {
10 every: RM_WhereInput # recurse -> M_WhereInput
11 none: RM_WhereInput # recurse -> M_WhereInput
12 some: RM_WhereInput # recurse -> M_WhereInput
13}
14
15# This type shows up in the context of t.crud.update<M> and t.crud.upsert<M>
16
17input RM_ScalarWhereInput {
18 AND: [RM_ScalarWhereInput!]
19 NOT: [RM_ScalarWhereInput!]
20 OR: [RM_ScalarWhereInput!]
21 RMSF: S_Filter
22}

Scalar Filters

Boolean

1input BooleanFilter {
2 equals: Boolean
3 not: Boolean
4}

String

1input StringFilter {
2 contains: String
3 endsWith: String
4 equals: String
5 gt: String
6 gte: String
7 in: [String!]
8 lt: String
9 lte: String
10 not: String
11 notIn: [String!]
12 startsWith: String
13}

Int

1input IntFilter {
2 equals: S
3 gt: S
4 gte: S
5 in: [S!]
6 lt: S
7 lte: S
8 not: S
9 notIn: [S!]
10}

Float

Uses the same filter structure as Int.

1input FloatFilter {
2 # ... see IntFilter
3}

DateTime

Uses the same filter structure as Int. We are considering a tailored DateTime filter.

1input DateTimeFilter {
2 # ... see IntFilter
3}

UUID

Uses the same filter structure as String.

1input UUIDFilter {
2 # ... see StringFilter
3}

ID

Uses the same filter type as String. We are considering a dedicated ID filter type for consistentcy.

GraphQL Schema Contributions Legend

How to read

1M = model F = field L = list S = scalar R = relation E = enum V = value
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